Update: Paris Traceroute bug from Early 2018

In December 2017, M-Lab was notified of oddities in the Paris Traceroute data, which we then wrote about in January 2018. Upon investigation, a bug in the Paris Traceroute code was identified. The bug caused bad measurement data in 2.7% of the traceroutes since July 2016.

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SIGCOMM 2018 Hackathon Outcomes

SIGCOMM Hackathon - M-Lab Participants Working

M-Lab had the pleasure of attending the first ever SIGCOMM hackathon on August 25, 2018, at the Nokia Skypark headquarters in Budapest, Hungary. The hackathon, sponsored by Nokia, DECIX, and Netflix, invited network research faculty, students, and industry professionals from around the world to form teams and develop tools, new features or analyses during the Saturday following the SIGCOMM conference.

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M-Lab 10 Year Anniversary Event

We’ve reached a point in human history where, for many of us, the internet has become a standard presence in our daily lives. In the United States, the internet is simply part of how many of us engage with the world. In other countries (and parts of this one), the internet remains unaffordable, unreliable, and inaccessible. The internet unites us in many ways, and at the center of work on the future of the internet is a dedicated community of experts exploring the questions that will move the internet to the next level of its evolution: What is an open internet? What is a healthy internet? What factors contribute to the internet ecosystem’s health?

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Switch discard investigation for early 2018

On February 1st, 2018, during a regular data quality review, we identified an increase in switch discards at sites with 10Gbps equipment connected to 1Gbps uplinks. We used our switch telemetry data to assess whether there were any negative consequences for tests contained in our SideStream or NDT data sets, and then we used the same data sets to determine whether our remediation strategy had any negative effects. In both cases, we found no observable effects, indicating that everything was below the noise floor for Internet performance data.

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